0001444192 Acasti Pharma Inc. false --03-31 Q2 2021 1 1 10.48 10.48 10.08 10.08 2.50 2.16 2.00 1.6 0 1 1 1 1 17.20 0 10 0 0 0 0 Equipment September 30, 2021 Cost, net of impairment Accumulated depreciation Net book value Furniture and office equipment 17 (5 ) 12 Computer equipment 96 (29 ) 67 Laboratory equipment 584 (436 ) 148 Production equipment 1,179 (1,026 ) 153 1,876 (1,496 ) 380 Equipment is made up of laboratory, production, computer, and office equipment that was utilized in the development of CaPre. Similarly, to the intangible assets and Other assets, the announcement of the failed Phase 3 clinical trials for CaPre resulted in an impairment trigger for the laboratory and production equipment. The impairment loss is based on management’s estimate of the fair value of the equipment less cost -to sell, which is based primarily on estimated market prices obtained from brokers specialized in selling used equipment. These projections are based on Level 3 inputs of the fair value hierarchy and reflect the Corporation’s best estimate of market participants’ pricing of the assets as well as the general condition of the assets. Other assets Other assets represent krill oil (RKO) held by the Corporation that was expected to be used in commercial inventory scale up related to the development and commercialization of the CaPre drug candidate. Given that the development of CaPre will no longer be pursued by Acasti, the Corporation is expected to sell this reserve. The other asset is being recorded at the fair value less costs to sell. Management's estimate of the fair value of the RKO less cost -to sell, was based primarily on estimated market prices at year end obtained from an appraiser specializing in the krill oil market. Market prices have not changed materially since year end. 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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

______________________________________

 

FORM 10-Q

______________________________________

(Mark One)

 

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2021

 

or

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from                 to                 

Commission file number: 001-35776

______________________________________

 

Acasti Pharma Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

______________________________________

 

Québec, Canada

98-1359336

(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. Employer
Identification Number)

 

3009 boul. de la Concorde East, Suite 102

Laval, Québec, Canada H7E 2B5

(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code)

 

450-686-4555

(Registrants telephone number, including area code)

______________________________________

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

Trading Symbol(s)

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Shares, no par value per share

ACST

NASDAQ Stock Market

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  ☒    No  ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes  ☒    No  ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

 

Accelerated filer

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

Smaller reporting company

 

Emerging growth company

    

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.   ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934).    Yes     No  ☒

 

The number of outstanding common shares of the registrant, no par value per share, as of November 10, 2021, was 44,288,183.

 

 

1

 

 

 

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

 

QUARTERLY REPORT ON FORM 10-Q

 

For the Quarter Ended September 30, 2021

 

Table of Contents

 

   

Page

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1.

Financial Statements

10

     

Item 2.

Managements Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

31

     

Item 3.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

60

     

Item 4.

Controls and Procedures

60

     

PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1.

Legal Proceedings

61

     

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

61

     

Item 2.

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

90

     

Item 3.

Defaults upon Senior Securities

90

     

Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

90

     

Item 5.

Other Information

91

     

Item 6.

Exhibits

91

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 
 

 

SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This quarterly report contains information that may be forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and forward-looking information within the meaning of Canadian securities laws, both of which we refer to in this quarterly report as forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of terms such as “may”, “will”, “should”, “expect”, “plan”, “anticipate”, “believe”, “intend”, “estimate”, “predict”, “potential”, “continue” or other similar expressions concerning matters that are not statements about the present or historical facts. Forward-looking statements in this quarterly report include, among other things, information or statements about:

 

 

our ability to build a premier, late-stage specialty pharmaceutical company specialized in rare and orphan disease and focused on developing and commercializing products that improve clinical outcomes using novel drug delivery technologies;

     
 

our ability to apply new proprietary formulations to existing pharmaceutical compounds to achieve enhanced efficacy, faster onset of action, reduced side effects, and more convenient drug delivery that can result in increased patient compliance;

     
 

the potential for our drug candidates to receive orphan drug status from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) or regulatory approval under the Section 505 (b)(2) regulatory pathway under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act;

     
 

the future prospects of our GTX-104 drug candidate, including but not limited to GTX-104’s potential to be administered to improve the management of hypotension; GTX-104’s potential to reduce the incidence of vasospasm and lead to better outcomes; the ability of GTX-104 to achieve a PKpharmacokinetic (“PK”) and safety profile similar to the oral form of nimodipine; GTX-104’s potential to provide improved bioavailability and the potential for reduced use of rescue therapies, such as vasopressors; the timing of the completion of the PK bridging study, and the timing and outcome of the Phase 3 safety study for GTX-104; our ability to ultimately file a new drug application (“NDA”) for GTX-104 under Section 505 (b)(2) NDA; and the timing and ability to receive FDA approval for marketing GTX-104;
     
 

the future prospects of our GTX-101 drug candidate, including but not limited to GTX-101’s potential to be administered to postherpetic neuralgia patients to treat pain associated with the disease; assumptions about the biphasic delivery mechanism of GTX-101, including its potential for rapid onset and continuous pain relief for up to eight hours; and the timing and outcomes of single ascending dose/multiple ascending dose and PK bridging studies and a Phase 2 and Phase 3 efficacy and safety study; the timing of an NDA filing under Section 505 (b)(2) for GTX-101; and the timing and ability to receive FDA approval for marketing GTX-101;
     
 

the future prospects of our GTX-102 drug candidate, including but not limited to GTX-102’s potential to provide clinical benefits to decrease Ataxia Telangiectasia symptoms; GTX-102’s potential ease of drug administration; the timing and outcomes of a PK bridging study and a Phase 3 efficacy and safety study for  GTX-102; the timing of an NDA filing under Section 505 (b)(2) in connection with GTX-102; and the ability to receive FDA approval for marketing GTX-102;
     
 

the quality of our clinical data, the cost and size of our development programs, expectations and forecasts related to our target markets and the size of our target markets; the cost and size of our commercial infrastructure and manufacturing needs in the United States, European Union, and the rest of the world; and our expected use of a range of third-party contract research organizations (“CROs”) and contract manufacturing organizations (“CMOs”) at diverse locations;

     
 

expectations and forecasts related to our intellectual property portfolio, including but not limited to consequences of orphan drug status designation from the FDA for our leading pipeline products; our patent portfolio strategy; and outcomes of our patent protection filings;

 

3

 

 

our strategy, future operations, prospects and the plans of our management with a goal to enhance shareholder value, following our recent merger with Grace Therapeutics Inc. (“Grace”);

     
 

our intellectual property position and duration of our patent rights;

     
 

the potential adverse effects that the COVID-19 pandemic may have on our business and operations;

     
 

our need for additional financing, and our estimates regarding our operating runway and future financing and capital requirements;

     
 

our expectation regarding our financial performance, including our costs and expenses, liquidity, and capital resources;

     
 

our projected capital requirements to fund our anticipated expenses; and 

     
  our ability to establish collaborations or obtain additional funding.

 

Although the forward-looking statements in this quarterly report are based upon what we believe are reasonable assumptions, you should not place undue reliance on those forward-looking statements since actual results may vary materially from them. Important assumptions made by us when making forward-looking statements include, among other things, assumptions by us that:

 

  we are able to attract and retain key management and skilled personnel;
     
 

third parties provide their services to us on a timely and effective basis;

     
 

we are able to take advantage of new business opportunities in the pharmaceutical industry;

     
 

we are able to secure and defend our intellectual property rights, and to avoid infringing upon the intellectual property rights of third parties;

     
 

the shareholder litigation relating to our merger with Grace is resolved in a manner favorable to us and we face no additional lawsuits or other proceedings, or any such matters, if they arise, are satisfactorily resolved;

     
 

there are no material adverse changes in relevant laws or regulations; and

     
 

we are able to obtain the additional capital and financing we require when we need it.

 

In addition, the forward-looking statements in this quarterly report are subject to a number of known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors many of which are beyond our control, that could cause our actual results and developments to differ materially from those that are disclosed in or implied by the forward-looking statements, including, among others:

 

4

 

  We may not achieve our publicly announced milestones on time, or at all.
     
 

A failure to successfully integrate the businesses of Acasti and Acasti Pharma U.S., Inc. (“Acasti Pharma U.S.”, which is formerly Grace) in the expected timeframe would adversely affect our future results.

     
 

Our future results will suffer if we do not effectively manage our expanded operations.

     
 

We have incurred and expect to continue to incur substantial expenses related to the merger and expect to continue to incur substantial expenses related to the integration of the companies.

     
  Business disruptions could seriously harm our future revenue and financial condition and increase our costs and expenses.
     
  We may be subject to foreign exchange rate fluctuations.
     
  If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our stock price and trading volume could decline.
     
  Lawsuits have been filed, and other lawsuits may be filed, against us and members of our board of directors challenging the Grace merger, and an adverse ruling in any such lawsuit may result in an award of damages against us.
     
 

Our future success depends on our ability to retain key executives and to attract, retain and motivate qualified personnel.

     
 

We will need to expand our organization, and we may experience difficulties in managing this growth, which could disrupt our operations and our ability to compete.

     
 

We may face future product liability, and if claims are brought against us, we may incur substantial liability.

     
 

We rely significantly on information technology and any failure, inadequacy, interruption or security lapse of that technology, including any cybersecurity incidents, could harm our ability to operate our business effectively.

     
 

Even if our drug candidates receive regulatory approval in the United States, we may never obtain regulatory approval or successfully commercialize our products outside of the United States.

     
 

We are subject to uncertainty relating to healthcare reform measures and reimbursement policies which, if not favorable to our drug candidates, could hinder or prevent our drug candidates’ commercial success.

     
 

Our commercial success depends upon attaining significant market acceptance of our drug products and drug candidates, if approved, among physicians, nurses, pharmacists, patients and the medical community.

     
 

Guidelines and recommendations published by government agencies can reduce the use of our drug candidates and negatively impact our ability to gain market acceptance and market share.

     
 

If we are unable to establish sales and marketing capabilities or enter into agreements with third parties to market and sell our drug products, if approved, we may be unable to generate any revenue.

     
 

If we obtain approval to commercialize any approved drug products outside of the United States, a variety of risks associated with international operations could materially adversely affect our business.

 

5

 

 

If we are unable to differentiate our drug products from branded reference drugs or existing generic therapies for similar treatments, or if the FDA or other applicable regulatory authorities approve products that compete with any of our drug products, our ability to successfully commercialize our drug products would be adversely affected.

     
 

We face significant competition from other biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, and our operating results will suffer if we fail to compete effectively.

     
 

We could incur substantial costs and disruption to our business and delays in the launch of our drug products if our competitors and/or collaborators bring legal actions against us, which could harm our business and operating results.

     
 

The COVID-19 pandemic, or a similar pandemic, epidemic, or outbreak of an infectious disease, may materially and adversely affect our business and our financial results and could cause a disruption to the development of our drug candidates.

     
 

We are subject to numerous complex regulatory requirements and failure to comply with these regulations, or the cost of compliance with these regulations, may harm our business.

     
 

We are heavily dependent on the success of our lead drug candidates, GTX-104, GTX-102 and GTX-101.

     
 

If the FDA does not conclude that our drug candidates satisfy the requirements for the 505(b)(2) regulatory approval pathway, or if the requirements for approval of any of our drug candidates under Section 505(b)(2) are not as we expect, the approval pathway for our drug candidates will likely take significantly longer, cost significantly more and encounter significantly greater complications and risks than anticipated, and in any case may not be successful.

     
 

Clinical development is a lengthy and expensive process with an uncertain outcome, and results of earlier studies and trials may not be predictive of future trial results. Failure can occur at any stage of clinical development.

     
 

Delays in clinical trials are common and have many causes, and any delay could result in increased costs to us and could jeopardize or delay our ability to obtain regulatory approval and commence product sales. We may also find it difficult to enroll patients in our clinical trials, which could delay or prevent development of our drug candidates.

     
 

Our drug products or drug candidates may cause adverse effects or have other properties that could delay or prevent their regulatory approval or limit the scope of any approved label or market acceptance, or result in significant negative consequences following marketing approval, if any.

     
 

The regulatory approval processes of the FDA and comparable foreign authorities are lengthy, time consuming and inherently unpredictable, and if we are ultimately unable to obtain regulatory approval for our drug candidates, our business will be substantially harmed.

     
 

An NDA submitted under Section 505(b)(2) subjects us to the risk that we may be subject to a patent infringement lawsuit that would delay or prevent the review or approval of our drug candidate. The FDA and other regulatory agencies actively enforce the laws and regulations prohibiting the promotion of off-label uses.

     
 

Our business is subject to extensive regulatory requirements and our drug candidates that obtain regulatory approval will be subject to ongoing and continued regulatory review, which may result in significant expense and limit our ability to commercialize such products.

 

6

 

 

Our employees, independent contractors, principal investigators, consultants, commercial partners and vendors may engage in misconduct or other improper activities, including non-compliance with regulatory standards and requirements.

     
 

Any relationships with healthcare professionals, principal investigators, consultants, customers (actual and potential) and third-party payors are and will continue to be subject, directly, or indirectly, to federal and state healthcare fraud and abuse laws, false claims laws, marketing expenditure tracking and disclosure, or sunshine laws, government price reporting and health information privacy and security laws. If we are unable to comply, or have not fully complied, with such laws, we could face penalties, including, without limitation, civil, criminal, and administrative penalties, damages, monetary fines, disgorgement, possible exclusion from participation in Medicare, Medicaid and other federal healthcare programs, contractual damages, reputational harm, diminished profits and future earnings and curtailment or restructuring of our operations.

     
 

We are required to obtain regulatory approval for each of our drug candidates in each jurisdiction in which we intend to market such drug products, and the inability to obtain such approvals would limit our ability to realize their full market potential.

     
 

If we are sued for infringing intellectual property rights of third parties, it will be costly and time consuming, and an unfavorable outcome in that litigation would have a material adverse effect on our business.

     
 

Our success depends in part upon our ability to protect our intellectual property for our drug candidates, such as GTX-104, GTX-102 and GTX-101.

     
 

Our drug development strategy relies heavily upon the 505(b)(2) regulatory pathway, which requires us to certify that we do not infringe upon third-party patents covering approved drugs. Such certifications often result in third-party claims of intellectual property infringement, the defense of which can be costly and time consuming, and an unfavorable outcome in any such litigation may prevent or delay our development and commercialization efforts, which would harm our business.
     
 

If we fail to comply with our obligations in the agreements under which we license rights to technology from third parties, or if the license agreements are terminated for other reasons, we could lose license rights that are important to our business.

     
 

We may be subject to claims that our employees, consultants, or independent contractors have wrongfully used or disclosed confidential information of third parties.

     
 

We may be subject to claims challenging our inventorship or ownership of our patents and other intellectual property.

     
 

Intellectual property rights do not necessarily address all potential threats to our competitive advantage.

     
 

Changes in patent law could diminish the value of patents in general, thereby impairing our ability to protect any of our other future drug products and drug candidates.

     
 

We may not be able to protect our intellectual property rights throughout the world.

     
 

We do not have internal manufacturing capabilities, and if we fail to develop and maintain supply relationships with various third-party manufacturers, we may be unable to develop or commercialize our drug candidates.

     
 

Our contract manufacturers may encounter manufacturing failures that could delay the clinical development or regulatory approval of our drug candidates, or their commercial production if approved.

 

7

 

 

We rely on third parties to conduct our preclinical studies and clinical trials. If these third parties do not successfully carry out their contractual duties or meet expected deadlines, we may not be able to obtain regulatory approval for or commercialize our drug candidates and our business could be substantially harmed.

     
 

We rely on third parties to manufacture commercial and clinical supplies of our drug candidates, and we intend to rely on third parties to manufacture commercial supplies of any approved drug products. The commercialization of any of our drug products could be stopped, delayed, or made less profitable if those third parties fail to provide us with sufficient quantities of active pharmaceutical ingredients, excipients, or drug products, or fail to do so at acceptable quality levels or prices or fail to maintain or achieve satisfactory regulatory compliance.
     
 

The design, development, manufacture, supply, and distribution of our drug candidates are highly regulated and technically complex.

     
 

We may not be successful in establishing development and commercialization collaborations which could adversely affect, and potentially prevent, our ability to develop our drug candidates.

     
 

We may not be successful in maintaining development and commercialization collaborations, and any partner may not devote sufficient resources to the development or commercialization of our drug candidates or may otherwise fail in development or commercialization efforts, which could adversely affect our ability to develop certain of our drug candidates and our financial condition and operating results.

     
 

We may be treated as a passive foreign investment corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

     
 

We may not be able to use our net operating loss carryforwards to offset future taxable income for Canadian or U.S. federal income tax purposes.

     
 

We do not expect to pay any cash dividends for the foreseeable future.

     
 

The price of our common shares may be volatile.

     
 

Raising additional capital in the future may cause dilution to our existing shareholders, restrict our operations or require us to relinquish rights to our technologies or drug candidates.

     
 

The market price of our common shares could decline as a result of operating results falling below the expectations of investors or fluctuations in operating results each quarter.

     
 

An active market for our common shares may not be sustained.

     
 

If we fail to meet applicable listing requirements, the NASDAQ Stock Market or the TSX Venture Exchange may delist our common shares from trading, in which case the liquidity and market price of our common shares could decline.
     
 

We may pursue opportunities or transactions that adversely affect our business and financial condition.

     
 

We are a “smaller reporting company” under the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s (“SEC’s”) disclosure rules and have elected to comply with the reduced disclosure requirements applicable to smaller reporting companies.

     
 

As a non-accelerated filer, we are not required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.

     
 

We are a Québec incorporated company headquartered in Canada, and U.S. investors may be unable to enforce certain judgments against us.

 

8

 

All of the forward-looking statements in this quarterly report are qualified by this cautionary statement. There can be no guarantee that the results or developments that we anticipate will be realized or, even if substantially realized, that they will have the consequences or effects on our business, financial condition, or results of operations that we anticipate. As a result, you should not place undue reliance on the forward-looking statements. Except as required by applicable law, we do not undertake to update or amend any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. All forward-looking statements are made as of the date of this quarterly report.

 

We express all amounts in this quarterly report in U.S. dollars, except where otherwise indicated. References to “$” and “U.S.$” are to U.S. dollars and references to “C$” or “CAD$” are to Canadian dollars.

 

Except as otherwise indicated, references in this quarterly report to “Acasti,” “the Corporation,” “we,” “us” and “our” refer to Acasti Pharma Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries, including Acasti Pharma U.S., which is formerly Grace.

 

9

 

 

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

Item 1: Financial Information

 

Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

 

Condensed Consolidated Interim Balance sheets

 

12

     

Condensed Consolidated Interim Statements of Income (Loss) and Comprehensive Income (Loss)

 

13

     

Condensed Consolidated Interim Statements of Changes Shareholders’ Equity

 

14

     

Condensed Consolidated Interim Statements of Cash Flows

 

15

     

Notes to the Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

 

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements of
(Unaudited)

 

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

 

Three and Six-month periods ended September 30, 2021, and 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

 

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

Condensed Consolidated Interim Balance sheet

(Unaudited)

 

      

September 30,

2021

  

March 31,

2021

 

(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)

 

Notes

    $    $ 

Assets

            
             

Current assets:

            

Cash and cash equivalents

      36,929   50,942 

Short-term investments

  5   13,861   9,789 

Receivables

      813   530 

Assets held for sale

  7   764   768 

Prepaid expenses

      2,178   343 

Total current assets

      54,545   62,372 
             

Right of Use asset

      43   86 

Intangible assets

  4   65,208   - 

Total assets

      119,796   62,458 
             

Liabilities and shareholders’ equity

            

Current liabilities:

            

Trade and other payables

      4,433   1,493 

Lease liability

      43   86 

Total current liabilities

      4,476   1,579 
             
             

Derivative warrant liabilities

  8   1,116   5,219 

Total liabilities

      5,592   6,798 
             

Shareholders’ equity:

            

Common shares

 

 

4,9(a)   257,995   197,194 

Additional paid-in capital

      11,084   10,817 

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

      (6,720)  (6,333

)

Accumulated deficit

      (148,155)  (146,018

)

Total shareholder’s equity

      114,204   55,660 
             

Commitments and contingencies

  14       
             

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity

      119,796   62,458 

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited Interim financial statements.

 

 

12

 

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

Condensed Consolidated Interim Statements of Income (Loss) and Comprehensive Income (Loss)

(Unaudited)

 

Three-month and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021 and 2020

 

      

Three-month periods ended

  

Six-month periods ended

 
      

September 30,

2021

  

September 30,

2020

  

September 30,

2021

  

September 30,

2020

 

(Expressed in thousands of U.S dollars, except per share data)

 

Notes

    $          

Operating expenses

                    

Research and development expenses, net of government assistance

  10   (585)  (1,286

)

  (1,054)  (3,042

)

General and administrative expenses

      (2,957)  (1,324

)

  (5,633)  (2,973

)

Sales and marketing expenses

      (25)  (134

)

  (25)  (850

)

Impairment of intangible assets

  6   -   (3,706

)

  -   (3,706

)

Impairment of equipment

  7      (1,584

)

     (1,584

)

Loss from operating activities

      (3,567)  (8,034

)

  (6,712)  (12,155

)

                     

Financial income (expenses)

  11   4,548   1,888   4,575   1,343 
                     

Net income (loss) and total comprehensive loss

      981   (6,146

)

  (2,137)  (10,812

)

                     

Basic and diluted income (loss) per share

      0.03   (0.52

)

  (0.13)  (0.93

)

                     

Weighted average number of shares outstanding

      32,788,275   11,889,941   29,436,032   11,614,716 

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited interim financial statements

 

 

13

 

ACASTI PARMA INC.

Condensed Consolidated Interim Statements of Changes in Shareholder’s Equity

(Unaudited)

 

Three-month and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021 and 2020

 

           

Common Shares

                                 

(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)

 

Notes

   

Number

   

Dollar

   

Additional
paid-in
capital

   

Accumulated
other
comprehensive
loss

   

Accumulated

deficit

   

Total

 
                       $        $         $          $         $  

Balance, March 31, 2021

    1       26,046,950       197,194       10,817       (6,333

)

    (146,018

)

    55,660  

Net loss and total comprehensive loss for the period

            -       -       -       -       (3,118

)

    (3,118

)

Cumulative translation adjustment

            -       -       -       762       -       762  

Stock based compensation

    12       -       -       153       -       -       153  

Balance at June 30, 2021

            26,046,950       197,194       10,970       (5,571

)

    (149,136

)

    53,457  
                                                         

Net loss and total comprehensive loss for the period

            -       -       -       -       981       981  

Cumulative translation adjustment

            -       -       -       (1,149 )     -       (1,149 )

Stock based compensation

    12               -       114       -       -       114  

Common shares issued in relation to merger with Grace via share-for-share

    4       18,241,233       60,801       -       -       -       60,801  

Balance at September 30, 2021

            44,288,183       257,995       11,084       (6,720 )     (148,155 )     114,204  

 

 

 

           

Common Shares

                                 

(Expressed in thousands of US dollars except for share data)

 

Notes

   

Number

   

Dollar

   

Additional

paid-in

capital

   

Accumulated

other

comprehensive

loss

   

Accumulated

deficit

   

Total

 
                       $         $         $         $         $  

Balance, March 31, 2020

            11,276,187       137,424       9,797       (7,887

)

    (126,340

)

    12,994  

Net loss and total comprehensive loss for the period

            -       -       -       -       (4,666

)

    (4,666

)

Cumulative translation adjustment

            -       -       -       308       -       308  

Net proceeds from shares issued under the at-the-market (ATM) program

 

 

9(a)       284,867       1,765       -       -       -       1,765  

Stock based compensation

    12       -       -       635       -       -       635  

Balance at June 30, 2020

            11,561,054       139,189       10,432       (7,579

)

    (131,006

)

    11,036  

Net loss and total comprehensive loss for the period

            -       -       -       -       (6,146

)

    (6,146

)

Cumulative translation adjustment

            -       -       -       179       -       179  

Net proceeds from shares issued under the at-the-market (ATM) program

 

 

9(a)       550,519       3,427       -       -       -       3,427  

Stock based compensation

            (2,924

)

    (46

)

    423       -       -       377  

Balance at September 30, 2020

            12,108,649       142,570       10,855       (7,400

)

    (137,152

)

    8,873  

 

14

 
 

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

Condensed Consolidated Interim Statements of Cash Flows

(Unaudited)

 

Three-month and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021 and 2020

 

           

Three-month periods ended

   

Six-month periods ended

 
           

September 30,

2021

   

September 30,

2020

   

September 30,

2021

   

September 30,

2020

 
                                         

(thousands of U.S. dollars)

 

Notes

       $        $        $        $  
                                         

Cash flows used in operating activities:

                                       

Net income (loss) for the period

            981       (6,146

)

    (2,137 )     (10,812

)

Adjustments:

                                       

Amortization of intangible assets

            -       319       -       781  

Depreciation of equipment

            -       56       -       142  

Impairment of intangible assets

            -       3,706       -       3,706  

Impairment of equipment

            -       1,584       -       1,584  

Stock-based compensation

    12       114       401       267       1,033  

Change in fair value of warrant liabilities

    8       (3,435 )     (2,027

)

    (4,080 )     (1,518

)

Write off of deferred financing costs of at-the-market (ATM) program

    9       -       142       -       264  

Unrealized foreign exchange (gain) loss

            (1,162 )     (20

)

    (420 )     (154

)

Changes in non-cash working capital items

    13       (2,602 )     (2,193

)

    (3,135 )     (3,371

)

Net cash used in operating activities

            (6,104 )     (4,178

)

    (9,505 )     (8,345

)

                                         

Cash flows from (used in) investing activities:

                                       

Acquisition of equipment

            -       (33

)

    -       (69

)

Acquisition of short-term investments

            (13,227 )     (21

)

    (21,528 )     (21

)

Maturity of short-term investment

            16,064       21       17,438       21  

Net cash from (used in) investing activities

            2,837       (33

)

    (4,090 )     (69

)

                                         

Cash flows from (used in) financing activities:

                                       

Net proceeds from issuance of common shares under the at-the-market (ATM)

 

 

9(a)             3,435       -       5,210  

Deferred financing costs paid

            -       (1

)

    -       (143

)

Net cash from (used in) financing activities

            -       3,434       -       5,067  
                                         

Effect of exchange rate fluctuations on cash and cash equivalents

            199       (31

)

    (312 )     (151

)

Translations effects on cash and cash equivalents related to reporting currency

            (978 )     238       (106 )     810  
                                         

Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents

            (4,046 )     (570

)

    (14,013 )     (2,688

)

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period

            40,975       12,122       50,942       14,240  

Cash and cash equivalents, end of period

            36,929       11,552       36,929       11,552  
                                         

Cash and cash equivalents are comprised of:

                                       

Cash

            36,929       6,064       36,929       6,064  

Cash equivalents

            -       5,488       -       5,488  

 

 


See accompanying notes to unaudited interim financial statements.

 

15

 

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)

 

Three-month and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021 and 2020

 

 

1.

Nature of Operation:

 

Acasti Pharma Inc. (“Acasti” or the “Corporation”) is incorporated under the Business Corporations Act (Québec) (formerly Part 1A of the Companies Act (Québec)). The Corporation is domiciled in Canada and its registered office is located at 3009 boul. de la Concorde East, Suite 102, Laval, Québec, Canada H7E 2B5.

 

In January 2020 and August 2020, the Corporation released Phase 3 clinical study results for the Corporation’s lead drug candidate, CaPre. The TRILOGY studies did not meet the primary endpoint which resulted in the Corporation’s Board of Directors making a decision not to proceed with a filing of an NDA with the FDA. With the completion of the TRILOGY studies beginning in the second half of fiscal 2021, marketing and research and development activities and expenses were reduced while management undertook a strategic review, and some CaPre related equipment and other assets were and continue to be classified as held for sale as they are expected to be sold.

 

In August 2021, the Corporation completed the acquisition of Grace Therapeutics, Inc. (“Grace”) a privately held emerging biopharmaceutical company focused on developing innovative drug delivery technologies for the treatment of rare and orphan diseases, via a share-for-share merger. The merged Corporation will focus on building a late-stage specialty pharmaceutical company specialized in rare and orphan diseases and focused on developing and commercializing products that improve clinical outcomes using novel drug delivery technologies. The Corporation seeks to apply new proprietary formulations to existing pharmaceutical compounds to achieve enhanced efficacy, faster onset of action, reduced side effects, more convenient delivery and increased patient compliance; all of which could result in improved patient outcomes. The active pharmaceutical ingredients chosen by the Corporation for further development may be already approved in the target indication or could be repurposed for use in new indications.

 

The Corporation has incurred operating losses and negative cash flows from operations in each year since its inception. The Corporation expects to incur significant expenses and continued operating losses for the foreseeable future. The Corporation expects its expenses will increase substantially in connection with its ongoing activities, particularly as it advances clinical development for the first three drug candidates in the Corporation’s pipeline; continue to engage contract manufacturing organizations (“CMOs”) to manufacture its clinical study materials and to develop large-scale manufacturing capabilities; seek regulatory approval for its product candidates; and add personnel to support its product development and future commercialization.

 

The Corporation does not expect to generate revenue from product sales unless and until it successfully completes drug development and obtains regulatory approval, which the Corporation expects will take several years and is subject to significant uncertainty. To date, the Corporation has financed its operations primarily through public offerings and private placements of its common shares, warrants and convertible debt and the proceeds from research tax credits. Until such time that the Corporation can generate significant revenue from product sales, if ever, it will require additional financing, which is expected to be sourced from a combination of public or private equity or debt financings or other non-dilutive sources, which may include fees from collaborations with third parties. Arrangements with collaborators or others may require the Corporation to relinquish certain rights related to its technologies or drug product candidates. Adequate additional financing may not be available to the Corporation on acceptable terms, or at all. The Corporation’s inability to raise capital as and when needed would have a negative impact on its financial condition and its ability to pursue its business strategy.

 

The Corporation remains subject to risks similar to other companies in the biopharmaceutical industry, including compliance with government regulations, protection of proprietary technology, dependence on third party contractors and consultants and potential product liability, among others.

 

 

16

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)

 

Three-month and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021 and 2020

 

1.

Nature of Operation (continued):

 

Reverse Stock Split

 

On August 26, 2021, the shareholders of the Corporation approved a resolution to undertake a reverse split of the common stock within a range of 1-6 to 1-8 with such specific ratio to be approved by the Acasti Board. All references in these financial statements to number of common shares, warrants and options, price per share and weighted average number of shares outstanding prior to the reverse split have been adjusted to reflect the approved reverse stock split of 1-8, which was made effective on August 31, 2021, on a retroactive basis as of the earliest period presented.

 

 

2.

Summary of significant accounting policies:

 

Basis of presentation:

 

These unaudited Consolidated Interim Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) and on a basis consistent with those accounting principles followed by the Corporation and disclosed in note 2 of its most recent Annual Consolidated Financial Statements, except as disclosed in note 3 – Recent accounting pronouncements and policies and note 4 Acquisition of Grace, and should be read in conjunction with such statements and Notes thereto.

 

Use of estimates:

 

The preparation of these financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, income, and expenses. Actual results may differ from these estimates.

 

Estimates are based on management’s best knowledge of current events and actions that management may undertake in the future. Estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to accounting estimates are recognized in the period in which the estimates are revised and in any future periods affected.

 

Estimates and assumptions include the measurement of derivative warrant liabilities (note 8), stock-based compensation (note 12), assets held for sale (note 5), acquisition of Grace, valuation of intangibles (note 4) and the take-or-pay contract (note 14(a)). Estimates and assumptions are also involved in measuring the accrual of services rendered with respect to research and developments expenditures at each reporting date, including whether contingencies should be accrued for, as well as in determining which research and development expenses qualify for investment tax credits and in what amounts. The Corporation recognizes the tax credits once it has reasonable assurance that they will be realized. Recorded tax credits are subject to review and approval by tax authorities and, therefore, could be different from the amounts recorded.

 

17

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)

 

Three-month and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021 and 2020

 

2.

Summary of significant accounting policies (continued):

 

Intangible assets - acquired in-process research and development

 

In a business combination, the fair value of in-process research and development (“IPR&D”) acquired is capitalized and accounted for as indefinite-lived intangible assets, and not amortized until the underlying project receives regulatory approval, at which point the intangible assets will be accounted for as definite-lived intangible assets and amortized over the remaining useful life or discontinued. If discontinued, the intangible asset will be written off. Research and development (“R&D”) costs incurred after the acquisition are expensed as incurred.

 

The estimated fair values of identifiable intangible assets were determined using the "income approach" which is a valuation technique that provides an estimate of the fair value of an asset based on market participant expectations of the cash flows an asset would generate over its remaining useful life. Some of the assumptions inherent in the development of these asset valuations include the estimated net cash flows for each year for the asset (including net revenues, cost of products sold, R&D costs, and selling and marketing costs), the appropriate discount rate necessary to measure the risk inherent in each future cash flow stream, the life cycle of each asset, the potential regulatory and commercial success risk, competitive trends impacting the asset and each cash flow stream, as well as other factors.

 

Indefinite-lived assets are not amortized but are subject to an impairment review annually and more frequently when indicators of impairment exist. An impairment of indefinite-lived intangible assets would occur if the fair value of the intangible asset is less than the carrying value.

 

The Corporation tests indefinite-lived intangible assets for impairment by first assessing qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value is less than its carrying amount. If the Corporation concludes it is more likely than not that the fair value is less than its carrying amount, a quantitative impairment test is performed. For its quantitative impairment tests, the Corporation uses an estimated future cash flow approach that requires significant judgment with respect to future sales volume, sales price and expense growth rates, changes in working capital use, the selection of an appropriate discount rate, asset groupings and other assumptions and estimates. The use of alternative estimates and assumptions could increase or decrease the estimated fair value of the assets and potentially result in different impacts to the Corporation's results of operations.

 

 

3.

Recent accounting pronouncements

 

In June 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued ASU 2016-13-Financial Instruments-Credit Losses (Topic 326), which amends guidance on reporting credit losses for assets held at amortized cost basis and available for sale debt securities. For assets held at amortized cost, the new guidance eliminates the probable initial recognition threshold in current U.S. GAAP and, instead, requires an entity to reflect its current estimate of all expected credit losses. The allowance for credit losses is a valuation account that is deducted from the amortized cost basis of the financial assets to present the net amount expected to be collected. ASU 2016-13 will affect loans, debt securities, trade receivables, net investments in leases, off balance sheet credit exposures, and any other financial assets not excluded from the scope that have the contractual right to receive cash. ASU 2016-13 is effective for annual periods, and interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2022. Management has not yet evaluated the impact of this ASU on the consolidated financial statements.

 

18

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)

 

Three-month and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021 and 2020

 

 

4.

Acquisition of Grace

 

On August 27, 2021, the Corporation completed its acquisition of all outstanding equity interests in Grace Therapeutics Inc, via a merger. Grace, based in New Jersey and organized under the laws of Delaware, was a rare and orphan disease specialty pharmaceutical company.

 

In connection with the share-for-share noncash transaction, Grace was merged with a new wholly owned subsidiary of Acasti and became a subsidiary of Acasti. As a result, Acasti acquired Grace’s entire therapeutic pipeline consisting of three unique clinical stage and multiple pre-clinical stage assets supported by an intellectual property portfolio consisting of various granted and pending patents in various jurisdictions worldwide. Under the terms of the acquisition, each issued and outstanding share of Grace common stock was automatically converted into the right to receive Acasti common shares equal to the equity exchange ratio set forth in the merger agreement.

 

Consideration for acquisition

A total of 18,241,233 common shares of Acasti have been issued to Grace stockholders as consideration for the acquisition.

 

Total common shares issued

  18,241,233 

Acasti share price (closing share price on August 27, 2021)

 $3.3344 

Fair value of common shares issued

 $60,824 

 

The acquisition of Grace has been accounted for as a business combination using the acquisition method of accounting. This acquisition method requires, among other things, that assets acquired, and liabilities assumed in a business combination be recognized at their fair values as of the acquisition date. The valuation of assets acquired, and liabilities assumed has not yet been finalized as of  September 30, 2021. As a result, the Corporation recorded preliminary estimates for the fair value of assets acquired and liabilities assumed as of the acquisition date. Finalization of the valuation during the measurement period could result in a change in the amounts recorded for the acquisition date of fair value of intangible assets, goodwill, property and equipment, and income taxes, among other items. The completion of the valuation will occur no later than one year from the acquisition date.

 

19

 

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)

 

Three-month and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021 and 2020

 

4.

Acquisition of Grace (continued):

 

The following table summarizes the preliminary fair value of assets acquired and liabilities assumed as of the acquisition date:

 

Assets acquired and liabilities assumed

    

Cash and equivalents

 $90 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 $74 

Intangible assets – in-process research and development

 $65,208 

Accounts payable and accrued expenses

 $(4,548)

Total assets acquired and liabilities assumed

 $60,824 

 

Intangible assets of $65,208 relate primarily to the value of IPR&D, related to Grace’s therapeutic pipeline, consisting of three unique clinical stage programs/assets supported by intellectual property.

 

Acquisition-related expenses, which were comprised primarily of regulatory, financial advisory and legal fees, totaled $2.5 million and $3.2 million, respectively for the three and six-months ended September 30, 2021, and were included in general and administrative expenses in the condensed consolidated interim statements of earnings. The net loss attributed to Grace in the consolidated interim statement of income (loss) for the three- and six-months period ended September 30, 2021, since the date of acquisition is immaterial.

 

Pro Forma Financial Information

 

The following table presents the unaudited pro forma combined results of Acasti and Grace for the six months ended September 30, 2021, as if the acquisition of Grace had occurred on April 1, 2020:

 

  

Six months ended

September 30, 2021

$

 

Net loss

  (5,892)

 

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information was prepared using the acquisition method of accounting and was based on the historical financial information of Acasti and Grace. The unaudited pro forma financial information is not necessarily indicative of what the consolidated results of operations would have been had the acquisition been completed on April 1, 2020. In addition, the unaudited pro forma financial information is not a projection of future results of operations of the combined company, nor does it reflect the realization of any synergies or cost savings associated with the acquisition.

 

20

 

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)

 

Three-month and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021 and 2020

 

 

5.

Short-term investments

 

The Corporation holds various marketable securities, with maturities greater than 3 months at the time of purchase, as follows:

 

   

September

30, 2021

   

March

31, 2021

 
       $        $  

Term deposits issued in US currency earning interest at ranges between 0.19% and 0.30% and maturing on various dates from November 4, 2021, to December 20, 2021

    12,419       7,542  

Term deposits issued in CAD currency earning interest at ranges between 0.51% and 0.60% and maturing on various dates from December 2, 2021, to December 20, 2021

    1,442       2,247  

Total short-term investments

    13,861       9,789  

 

 

6.

Impairment of intangible assets:

 

In prior years, the Corporation entered into agreements with Neptune Wellness Solutions Inc. (Neptune) pursuant to which the Corporation obtained a license and exercised its option under this license agreement to pay in advance future royalties payable to Neptune. This license allowed the Corporation to exploit the intellectual property rights in order to conduct clinical trials for its CaPre drug candidate. The Corporation tests intangible assets for impairment should circumstances change or events occur that would indicate that the fair value of an asset may be below its carrying value. During the second quarter of fiscal 2021, the Corporation released its Phase 3 clinical programs data and its failure to meet its primary endpoints, and the resulting decision to not file an NDA to obtain FDA approval for CaPre. In addition, a significant share price reduction occurred. Due to these indicators of impairment under ASC 350, the Corporation undertook an analysis to determine the fair value of its intangible asset this quarter.

 

In assessing the magnitude of any impairment of the license the Corporation considered all available evidence, including (i) significant adverse impact from business climate due to the Phase 3 clinical program’s failure to meet its primary endpoints, and the resulting decision to not file an NDA to obtain FDA approval for CaPre, and the resulting internal forecasts that no cash flows from the use of the license was possible, and (ii) management’s estimate that a market place participant would place minimal to no value on the license if it were to be sold on its own or in combination with other assets, recognized or not, which is a level 3 measurement in the fair value hierarchy which included unobservable inputs. Accordingly, an impairment loss of $3,706 was recognized in the second quarter of the year ended March 31, 2021, which represents the totality of the intangible assets net book value prior to the impairment trigger.

 

21

 

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)

 

Three-month and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021 and 2020

 

 

7.

Assets held for sale

 

During the period, the Corporation determined to actively market for sale Other assets and Equipment and has met the criteria for classification of assets held for sale: 

 

   

September

30, 2021

   

March

31, 2021

 
       $        $  

Other assets (a)

    384       387  

Equipment (b)

    380       381  
      764       768  

 

a.

Other assets

 

Other assets represent krill oil (“RKO”) held by the Corporation that was expected to be used in commercial inventory scale up related to the development and commercialization of the CaPre drug candidate. Given that the development of CaPre will no longer be pursued by Acasti, the Corporation is expected to sell this reserve. The other asset is being recorded at the fair value less cost to sell. Management’s estimate of the fair value of the RKO less cost to sell was based primarily on estimated market prices at the end of the Corporation’s fiscal year ended March 31, 2021, obtained from an appraiser specializing in the krill oil market. Market prices have not changed materially since the end of the Corporation’s fiscal year ended March 31, 2021. These projections are based on Level 3 inputs of the fair value hierarchy and reflect management’s best estimate of market participants’ pricing of the assets as well as the general condition of the asset.

 

b.

 

Equipment

 

September 30, 2021

 

Cost, net of

impairment

   

Accumulated

depreciation

   

Net

book

value

 
       $        $        $  

Furniture and office equipment

    17       (5 )     12  

Computer equipment

    96       (29 )     67  

Laboratory equipment

    584       (436 )     148  

Production equipment

    1,179       (1,026 )     153  
      1,876       (1,496 )     380  

 

Equipment is made up of laboratory, production, computer, and office equipment that was utilized in the development of CaPre. Similarly, to the intangible assets and Other assets, the announcement of the failed Phase 3 clinical trials for CaPre resulted in an impairment trigger for the laboratory and production equipment. The impairment loss is based on management’s estimate of the fair value of the equipment less cost to sell, which is based primarily on estimated market prices obtained from brokers specialized in selling used equipment. These projections are based on Level 3 inputs of the fair value hierarchy and reflect the Corporation’s best estimate of market participants’ pricing of the assets as well as the general condition of the assets.

 

22

 

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)

 

Three-month and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021 and 2020

 

 

8.

Derivative warrant liabilities:

 

In connection with the Canadian public offering that closed on May 9, 2018, the Corporation issued a total of 1,369,937 warrants. Each warrant entitles the holder thereof to acquire one common share at an exercise price of CAD $10.48 at any time until May 9, 2023. The warrants issued are derivative warrant liabilities given the warrant indenture contains certain contingent provisions that allow for cash settlement.

 

In connection with the U.S. public offering that closed on December 27, 2017, the Corporation issued a total of 1,225,366 warrants. Each warrant entitles the holder thereof to acquire one common share at an exercise price of $10.08 at any time until December 27, 2022. The warrants issued are derivative warrant liabilities given the currency of the exercise price is different from the Corporation’s functional currency.

 

The derivative warrant liabilities are measured at fair value at each reporting period and the reconciliation of changes in fair value is presented in the following tables:

 

   

Warrant liabilities issued
May 2018

   

Warrant liabilities issued
December 27, 2017

 
   

September 30, 2021

 

September 30, 2020

   

September30, 2021

   

September30, 2020

 
                                   

Balance – beginning of period

    2,597         1,146       2,622       1,247  

Change in fair value

    (1,970 )       (680 )     (2,110 )     (838 )

Translation effect

    (12 )       145       (11 )     150  

Balance – end of period

    615         611       501       559  
                                   

Fair value per share issuable

    0.75         0.74       0.57       0.63  

 

The fair value of the derivative warrant liabilities was estimated using the Black-Scholes option pricing model and based on the following assumptions:

 

  

Warrant liabilities issued
May 2018

  Warrant liabilities issued
December 27, 2017
 
  

September 30,

2021

  

March 31,

2021

  

September 30,

2021

  

March 31,

2021

 

Exercise price

 CAD$10.48  CAD$10.48  USD$10.08  USD$10.08 

Share price

 CAD$2.50  CAD$2.16  USD$2.00  USD$1.6 

Risk-free interest

  1.11%  1.39

%

  0.98%  0.92%

Estimated life (years)

  1.61   2.11   1.24   1.74 

Expected volatility

  147.89%  156.00

%

  154.32%  171.12%

Dividend

 

nil

  

nil

   nil   nil 

 

23

 

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)

 

Three-month and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021 and 2020

 

 

9.

Capital and other components of equity:

 

 

(a)

“At-the-marketsales agreement:

 

On February 14, 2019, the Corporation entered into an ATM sales agreement with B. Riley FBR, Inc. (“B. Riley”) pursuant to which common shares may be sold from time to time for aggregate gross proceeds of up to $30 million, with sales only being made on the NASDAQ Stock Market. The common shares would be issued at market prices prevailing at the time of the sale and, as a result, prices may vary between purchasers and during the period of distribution. The ATM program has a 3-year term and requires the Corporation to pay between 3% and 4% commission to B. Riley based on volume of sales made. On June 29, 2020, the Corporation entered into an amended and restated sales agreement (the “Sales Agreement”) with B. Riley, Oppenheimer & Co. Inc. and H.C. Wainwright & Co., LLC (collectively, the “Agents”) to amend the existing ATM program. Under the terms of the Sales Agreement, which has a three-year term, the Corporation may issue and sell from time-to-time common shares having an aggregate offering price of up to $75,000,000 through the Agents. Subject to the terms and conditions of the Sales Agreement, the Agents will use their commercially reasonable efforts to sell the common shares from time to time, based upon the Corporation’s instructions. The Corporation has no obligation to sell any of the common shares and may at any time suspend sales under the Sales Agreement. The Corporation and the Agents may terminate the Sales Agreement in accordance with its terms. Under the terms of the Sales Agreement, the Corporation has provided the Agents with customary indemnification rights and the Agents will be entitled to compensation at a commission rate equal to 3.0% of the gross proceeds from each sale of the common shares. The remaining balance of the costs incurred relating to the February 2019 ATM program for an amount of $115 were written off to financing expenses.

 

During the six-month period ended September 30, 2021, no common shares were sold under the ATM program. During the six-month period ended September 30, 2020, 835 common shares were sold for total net proceeds of approximately $5,210 with commissions, legal expenses and costs related to the share sale amounting to $180. The common shares were sold at the prevailing market prices, which resulted in an average price of approximately $6.46 per share. Accordingly, proportional costs of $18 related to the common shares sold have been reclassified from deferred financings costs to equity (note 15).

 

24

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)

 

Three-month and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021 and 2020

 

9.

Capital and other components of equity (continued):

 

 

(b)

Warrants:

 

The outstanding warrants of the Corporation are composed of the following as at September 30, 2021, and March 31, 2021:

 

  

September 30, 2021

  

March 31, 2021

 
  

Number
outstanding

  

Amount

  

Number
outstanding

  

Amount

 
                 

Liability

                

May 2018 Canadian public offering warrants(i)

  824,218   615   824,218   2,597 

December 2017 U.S. public offering warrants(ii)

  884,120   501   884,120   2,622 
   1,708,338   1,116   1,708,338   5,219 
                 

Equity

                

December 2017 US public offering broker warrants (iii)

  32,390   161   32,390   161 

February 2017 Canadian public offering warrants (iv)

  215,491   631   215,491   631 
   247,881   792   247,881   792 

 

(i)

Warrants to acquire one common share at an exercise price of CAD $10.48, expiring on May 9, 2023.

(ii)

Warrants to acquire one common share at an exercise price of $10.08, expiring on December 27, 2022.

(iii)

Warrants to acquire one common share at an exercise price of $10.10, expiring on December 19, 2022.

(iv)

Warrants to acquire one common share at an exercise price of CAD $17.20, expiring on February 21, 2022.

 

25

 

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)

 

Three-month and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021 and 2020

 

 

10.

Government assistance:

 

Government assistance is comprised of a government grant from the Canadian federal government and research and development investment tax credits receivable from the Québec provincial government, which relate to qualifiable research and development expenditures under the applicable tax laws. The amounts recorded as receivables are subject to a government tax audit and the final amounts received may differ from those recorded. For the six-month periods ended September 30, 2021, and September 30, 2020, the Corporation recorded $129 and $84, respectively, as a reduction of research and development expenses in the Statement of Loss and Comprehensive Loss.

 

In September 2019, the Corporation was awarded up to CAD $750 in non-dilutive and non-repayable funding from the National Research Council of Canada Industrial Research Assistance Program (“NRC IRAP”) to apply towards eligible research and development disbursements of the Corporation’s unique commercial production platform for CaPre. In October 2020, the Corporation received correspondence from the NRC IRAP that the eligible amount awarded to the Corporation for non-dilutive and non-repayable funding was reduced from up to CAD $750 to up to CAD $326. During the six-month period ended September 30, 2021, and September 30, 2020, the Corporation claimed nil and $79, respectively, in connection with this program, which has been recorded as a reduction of research and development expenses in the Consolidated Statements of Loss and Comprehensive Loss.

 

 

11.

Net financial income:

 

 

 

Three-month periods ended

  

Six-month periods ended

 
  

September 30,

2021

  

September 30,

2020

  

September 30,

2021

  

September 30,

2020

 
    $    $    $    $ 

Foreign exchange gain (loss)

  1,099   (12

)

  344   50 

Write-off of deferred financing fees related to at-the-market (ATM) program

  -   (142

)

  -   (264)

Change in fair value of warrant liabilities

  3,435   2,027   4,080   1,518 

Interest income

  14   15   151   39 

Financial income

  4,548   1,888   4,575   1,343

 

 

26

 

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)

 

Three-month and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021 and 2020

 

 

12.

Stock-based compensation:

 

At September 30, 2021, the Corporation has in place a stock option plan for directors, officers, employees, and consultants of the Corporation (“Stock Option Plan”). An amendment of the Stock Option Plan was approved by shareholders on August 26, 2021. The amendment provides for an increase to the existing limits for common shares reserved for issuance under the Stock Option Plan as well as certain changes to the minimum vesting period applicable to options granted to directors under the Stock Option Plan.

 

The Stock Option Plan continues to provide for the granting of options to purchase common shares. The exercise price of the stock options granted under this amended plan is not lower than the closing price of the common shares on the TSXV at the close of markets the day preceding the grant. The maximum number of common shares that may be issued upon exercise of options granted under the amended Stock Option Plan shall not exceed 10% of the aggregate number of issued and outstanding shares of the Corporation, from time to time. This resulted in an increase from 1,816,735 representing 15% of the issued and outstanding common shares as of August 26, 2020, to 4,428,818 representing 10% of the issued and outstanding common shares as of September 30, 2021. The terms and conditions for acquiring and exercising options are set by the Corporation’s Board of Directors, subject among others, to the following limitations: the term of the options cannot exceed ten years and (i) all options granted to a director will be vested evenly on a monthly basis over a period of at least twelve (12) months, and (ii) all options granted to an employee will be vested evenly on a quarterly basis over a period of at least thirty-six (36) months.

 

The total number of shares issued to any one consultant within any twelve-month period cannot exceed 2% of the Corporation’s total issued and outstanding shares (on a non-diluted basis). The Corporation is not authorized to grant within any twelve-month period such number of options under the Stock Option Plan that could result in a number of common shares issuable pursuant to options granted to (a) related persons exceeding 2% of the Corporation’s issued and outstanding common shares (on a non-diluted basis) on the date an option is granted, or (b) any one eligible person in a twelve-month period exceeding 2% of the Corporation’s issued and outstanding common shares (on a non-diluted basis) on the date an option is granted.

 

27

 

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)

 

Three-month and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021 and 2020

 

12.

Stock-based compensation (continued):

 

The following table summarizes information about activities within the Stock Option Plan for the three and six-month periods ended:

 

  

September 30, 2021

  

September 30, 2020

 
  

Weighted average
exercise price

  

Number of
options

  

Weighted average
exercise price

  

Number of
options

 
    CAD$        CAD$     

Outstanding at beginning of period

  8.33   911,871   7.97   1,241,611 

Granted

  -   -   -   - 

Exercised

  -   -   -   - 

Forfeited

  10.39   (7,995)  5.44   (45,030)

Expired

  -   -   -   - 

Outstanding at end of period

  8.32   903,876   8.06   1,196,581 
                 

Exercisable at end of period

                

 

No stock options were granted during the three and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021, and September 30, 2020. Compensation expense recognized under the Stock Option Plan for the three-month periods ended September 30, 2021, and September 30, 2020 was as follows:

 

  

Three-month periods ended

  

Six-month periods ended

 
  

September 30,

2021

  

September 30,

2020

  

September 30,

2021

  

September 30,

2020

 
  $  $  $  $ 

Research and development expenses

 38  105  88  246 

General and administrative expenses

 76  184  179  532 

Sales and marketing expenses

 -  112  -  255 
  114  401  267  1,033 

 

Stock-based compensation payment transactions:

 

The fair value of stock-based compensation transactions is measured using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. Measurement inputs include share price on measurement date, exercise price of the instrument, expected volatility (based on weighted average historic volatility for a duration equal to the weighted average life of the instruments, life based on the average of the vesting and contractual periods for employee awards as minimal prior exercises of options in which to establish historical exercise experience; and contractual life for broker warrants), and the risk-free interest rate (based on government bonds). Service and performance conditions attached to the transactions, if any, are not taken into account in determining fair value. The expected life of the stock options is not necessarily indicative of exercise patterns that may occur. The expected volatility reflects the assumption that the historical volatility over a period similar to the life of the options is indicative of future trends, which may also not necessarily be the actual outcome.

 

28

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)

 

Three-month and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021 and 2020

 

 

13.

Supplemental cash flow disclosure:

 

 

(a)

Changes in non-cash operating items:

 

 

Three-month periods ended

 

Six-month periods ended

 
 

September 30,

2021

 

September 30,

2020

 

September 30,

2021

 

September 30,

2020

 
  $  $  $  $ 

Receivables

 (380) (119

)

 (287) (47

)

Prepaid expenses

 (1,186) 250  (1,838) 544 

Other assets

 -  24  -  24 

Trade and other payables

 (1,036) (2,348

)

 (1,010) (3,892

)

  (2,602) (2,193

)

 (3,135) (3,371

)

 

 

14.

Commitments and contingencies:

 

In the ordinary course of business, the Corporation is at times subject to various legal proceedings and disputes. The Corporation assess its liabilities and contingencies in connection with outstanding legal proceedings utilizing the latest information available. Where it is probable that the Corporation will incur a loss and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated, the Corporation records a liability in its consolidated financial statements. These legal contingencies may be adjusted to reflect any relevant developments. Where a loss is not probable or the amount of loss is not estimable, the Corporation does not accrue legal contingencies. While the outcome of legal proceedings is inherently uncertain, based on information currently available, management believes that it has established appropriate legal reserves. Any incremental liabilities arising from pending legal proceedings are not expected to have a material adverse effect on the Corporation’s financial position, results of operations, or cash flows. However, it is possible that the ultimate resolution of these matters, if unfavorable, may be material to the Corporation’s financial position, results of operations, or cash flows. No reserves or liabilities have been accrued as at September 30, 2021.

 

 

(a)

Take or pay contract:

 

On October 25, 2019, the Corporation signed a supply agreement with Aker Biomarine Antartic.  (“Aker”) to purchase raw krill oil product for a committed volume of commercial starting material for CaPre for a total value of $3.1 million (take or pay). The delivery of the products must be completed by October 31, 2021. As at September 30, 2021, the remaining balance of the commitment with Aker amounts to $2.8 million. There are no termination provisions in the supply agreement. As of November 10, 2021, no krill oil product has been delivered under the supply agreement, nor has any payment of the remaining balance of the commitment been made by Acasti. Management is currently assessing whether the Corporation can recover value from the raw krill oil product and given the uncertainty of recoverability, the Corporation expects it may incur a loss on this contract in the near term, absent an amended arrangement with the counterparty.

 

29

 

ACASTI PHARMA INC.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Interim Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars except share data)

 

Three-month and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021 and 2020

 

 

15.

Subsequent events:

 

“At-the-market sales agreement:

 

On November 10, 2021, the Corporation filed a prospectus supplement relating to its at-the-market program with B. Riley, Oppenheimer& Co. Inc. and H.C. Wainwright & Co., LLC acting as agents. Under the terms of the ATM Sales Agreement and the prospectus supplement, the Corporation may issue and sell from time-to-time common shares having an aggregate offering price of up to $75,000,000 through the agents. The common shares will be distributed at market prices prevailing at the time of the sale and, as a result, prices may vary between purchasers and during the period of distribution. The volume and timing of sales under the ATM program, if any, will be determined at the sole discretion of the Corporation’s board of directors and management.

 

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Item 2. Managements Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation

 

This management’s discussion and analysis (“MD&A”), is presented in order to provide the reader with an overview of the financial results and changes to our balance sheet as at September 30, 2021, and for the three-month period then ended. This MD&A also explains the material variations in our results of operations, balance sheet and cash flows for the three and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021, and 2020.

 

Market data, and certain industry data and forecasts included in this MD&A, were obtained from internal corporation surveys and market research and those conducted by third parties hired by us, publicly available information, reports of governmental agencies and industry publications, and independent third-party surveys. We have relied upon industry publications as our primary sources for third-party industry data and forecasts. Industry surveys, publications and forecasts generally state that the information they contain has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but that the accuracy and completeness of that information is not guaranteed. We have not independently verified any of the data from third-party sources or the underlying economic assumptions they have made. Similarly, internal surveys, industry forecasts and market research, which we believe to be reliable based upon our management’s or contracted third parties’ knowledge of our industry, have not been independently verified. Our estimates involve risks and uncertainties, including assumptions that may prove not to be accurate, and these estimates and certain industry data are subject to change based on various factors, including those discussed in this quarterly report and in our most recently filed annual report on Form 10-K.

 

This MD&A, approved by the Board of Directors on November 10, 2021, should be read in conjunction with our unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements for the three and six-month periods ended September 30, 2021, and 2020 included in this quarterly report. Our interim financial statements were prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board in the United States (“U.S. GAAP”).

 

All amounts appearing in this MD&A for the period-by-period discussions are in thousands of U.S. dollars, except share and per share amounts or unless otherwise indicated.

 

Business Overview

 

On August 27, 2021, we completed our acquisition of Grace via a merger following the approval of Acasti’s shareholders and Grace’s stockholders. Following completion of the merger, Grace became a wholly owned subsidiary of Acasti and was renamed Acasti Pharma U.S. Inc.

 

The successful completion of the merger positions Acasti to build a premier, late-stage specialty pharmaceutical company specialized in rare and orphan disease and focused on developing and commercializing products that improve clinical outcomes using novel drug delivery technologies. We seek to apply new proprietary formulations to existing pharmaceutical compounds to achieve enhanced efficacy, faster onset of action, reduced side effects, and more convenient drug delivery and increased patient compliance; all of which could result in improved patient outcomes. The active ingredients chosen by Acasti for further development may be already approved in a target indication or could be repurposed for use in new indications.

 

In connection with the merger, we acquired Grace’s entire therapeutic pipeline addressing critical unmet medical needs for the treatment of rare and orphan diseases, consisting of three unique clinical stage and multiple pre-clinical stage assets supported by an intellectual property portfolio consisting of more than 40 granted and pending patents in various jurisdictions worldwide. These drug candidates aim to improve clinical outcomes by applying proprietary formulation and drug delivery technologies to existing pharmaceutical compounds to achieve improvements over the current standard of care, or to provide treatment for diseases with no currently approved therapy.

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Rare disorders represent an attractive area for drug development, and there remains an opportunity for Acasti to utilize already approved drugs that have established safety profiles and clinical experience to potentially address significant unmet medical needs. A key advantage of pursuing therapies for rare disorders is the potential to receive orphan drug designation (“ODD”) from the FDA. ODD provides for seven years of marketing exclusivity in the United States post-launch, provided certain conditions are met. Rare diseases also allow for more manageably scaled clinical trials and provide market opportunities that may require a smaller, more targeted commercial infrastructure.

 

In addition, the existing safety profiles of these products combined with the prospect to utilize the Section 505(b)(2) regulatory pathway under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (the “FFDCA”) may provide a potentially shorter path to regulatory approval. Under Section 505(b)(2), if sufficient support of a product’s safety and efficacy either through previous FDA experience or sufficiently within the scientific literature can be established, it may eliminate the need to conduct some of the early studies that new drug candidates might otherwise require.

 

The specific diseases targeted for drug development by Acasti are well understood although these patient populations may remain poorly served by available therapies or in some cases approved therapies do not yet exist. We aim to effectively treat debilitating symptoms that result from these underlying diseases.

 

Our three most advanced programs are:

 

    GTX-104, an IV formulation of nimodipine designed to treat Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (“SAH”), a rare brain disorder for which Acasti Pharma U.S. (formerly Grace) had completed multiple pharmacokinetic (“PK”) studies. SAH is a central nervous system condition that causes acute bleeding in the brain and requires immediate medical attention to prevent long-term disability or death. GTX-104 could be administered to improve the management of hypotension and reduce the incidence of vasospasm in SAH patients and potentially lead to better outcomes.
       
    GTX-102, an oral-mucosal betamethasone spray for the treatment of Ataxia Telangiectasia (“A-T”), an orphan pediatric complex genetic neurodegenerative disorder usually diagnosed in young children, for which no FDA approved treatment exists.
       
 

 

GTX-101, a topical bioadhesive film-forming bupivacaine spray for Postherpetic Neuralgia (“PHN”), which is persistent and often causes debilitating pain following infection by the shingles virus. We believe that GTX-101 could be administered to patients with PHN to treat pain associated with the disease.

 

Our management team possesses significant experience in drug delivery research and evaluation, clinical and pharmaceutical development and manufacturing, regulatory affairs, and business development, as well as being well versed in late-stage drug development and commercialization. The Acasti team has been collectively involved in the development and approval of several successful marketed drugs including TORADOL™, NAPROSYN™, ANDROGEL™, SUBSYS™, MARINOL™ and KEPPRA XR™.

 

The table below summarizes planned key calendar year milestones for our three clinical drug candidates:

 

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GTX-104 Overview

 

Nimodipine was granted FDA approval in 1988, and is the only drug approved to improve neurological outcomes in SAH. It is only available in the United States as a generic oral capsule and as a branded oral liquid solution called NYMALIZE™, which is manufactured and sold by Arbor Pharmaceuticals. Nimodipine has poor water solubility and high permeability characteristics as a result of its high lipophilicity. Additionally, orally administered nimodipine has dose-limiting side-effects such as hypotension, low bioavailability resulting from high first-pass metabolism, and a narrow administration window as food effects lower bioavailability significantly. Nimodipine capsules are also difficult to administer, particularly to unconscious patients or those with impaired swallowing. Concomitant use with CYP3A inhibitors is contraindicated (NIMODIPINE Capsule PI).

 

NIMOTOP™ is an injectable form of nimodipine that is manufactured by Bayer Healthcare. It is approved in Europe and other regulated markets (but not in the United States), but it has limited utility for SAH patients because of its high organic solvent content, namely 23.7% ethanol and 17% polyethylene glycol 400 (NIMOTOP SmPC).

 

GTX-104 is a clinical stage, novel formulation of nimodipine for IV infusion in SAH patients. It uses surfactant micelles as the drug carrier to solubilize nimodipine. This unique nimodipine injectable formulation is composed of a nimodipine base, an effective amount of polysorbate 80, a non-ionic hydrophilic surfactant, and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier for injection. GTX-104 is an aqueous solution substantially free of organic solvents, such that the nimodipine is contained in a concentrated injection solution, suspension, emulsion or complex as a micelle, a colloidal particle or an inclusion complex, and the formulation is stable and clear.

 

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GTX-104 could provide a more convenient dosing schedule as it may be administered every twelve hours in patients with SAH as compared to generic nimodipine capsules or NYMALIZE™, which must be administered every four hours. In addition, since GTX-104 is peripherally infused, the dosing regimen is continuous during the period of therapy as compared to six times per day for both NYMALIZE™ oral solution and nimodipine oral capsules. Therefore, GTX-104 could be considered as a major contribution to patient care by potentially reducing the dosing frequency to twice daily. In addition, GTX-104 has the potential to provide improved bioavailability and lower intra-subject variability. Because of its IV formulation, we also expect it to reduce drug-drug interactions or food effects.

 

Despite the positive impact it has on recovery, physicians often must discontinue their patients on oral nimodipine, primarily as a result of hypotensive episodes that cannot be controlled by titrating the oral form of drug. Such discontinuation could potentially be avoided by administering GTX-104, which because of its IV administration, may obviate the complexity that results from the need for careful attention to the timing of nimodipine administration at least once before or two hours after a meal. Administration of GTX-104 via a peripheral vein is often much more comfortable for the patients compared to administration by central venous access, which can often be a difficult and invasive procedure. Also, unconscious patients will likely receive more consistent concentrations of nimodipine when delivered by the IV route as compared to oral gavage or a nasogastric tube. More consistent dosing is expected to result in a reduction of vasospasm and a better, more consistent management of hypotension. As summarized in the table below, we anticipate reduced use of rescue therapies, such as vasopressors, and expensive hospital resources, such as the angiography suite, by more effectively managing blood pressure with GTX-104. Reduced incidences of vasospasm could result in shorter length of stay and better outcomes.

 

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About Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (SAH)

 

SAH is bleeding over the surface of the brain in the subarachnoid space between the brain and the skull, which contains blood vessels that supply the brain. A primary cause of such bleeding is rupture of an aneurysm. The result is a relatively uncommon type of stroke that accounts for about 5% of all strokes and has an incidence of six per 100,000 person years (Becske, 2018).

 

In contrast to common types of stroke in elderly individuals, an SAH often occurs at a relatively young age, with approximately half the affected patients younger than 60 years old (Becske, 2018). Particularly devastating for patients younger than 45, around 10% to 15% of aneurysmal SAH (“aSAH”) patients die before reaching the hospital (Rinkel, 2016), and those who survive the initial hours post hemorrhage are admitted or transferred to tertiary care centers with high risk of complications, including rebleeding and delayed cerebral ischemia (“DCI”). Systemic manifestations affecting cardiovascular, pulmonary, and renal function are common and often complicate management of DCI. Approximately 70% of aSAH patients experience death or a permanent dependence on family members, and half die within one month after the hemorrhage. Of those who survive the initial month, half remain permanently dependent on a caregiver to maintain daily living (Becske, 2018).

 

 

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Treatment offerings currently include sustained hypervolemia, hemodilution, and/or induced hypertension (Triple-H therapy), calcium antagonists and angioplasty. Because vasospasm may result from an increase of calcium in the vascular smooth-muscle cell, a medical rationale has emerged for the use of calcium antagonists. The addition of calcium antagonists like nimodipine to the treatment arsenal for the prevention of cerebral vasospasm after aSAH is based on the notion that these drugs can counteract the influx of calcium into the vascular smooth-muscle cell (Rinkel, 2002).

 

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The incidence of SAH in the United States is approximately 10 in every 100,000 persons per year (Becske, 2016; NINDS, 2016; Ingall, 1989; Schievink, 1995; Schievink, 1997; Zacharia, 2010), based on multiple analyses of the population of Rochester, Minnesota. Ingall (1989) studied the incidence of SAH in this population over the 40-year period from 1945 through 1984. At that time, the population of Rochester lent itself well to epidemiological studies because medical care was provided primarily by the Mayo Clinic. Over this period, the average annual incidence rate of aSAH remained constant at approximately 11 per 100,000 population. More recently, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Guidelines for the Management of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (Connolly, 2012) refer to the 2003 Nationwide Inpatient Sample as providing an annual estimate of 14.5 discharges for aSAH per 100,000 adults, although, because death resulting from aSAH often occurs before hospital admission (in an estimated 12% to 15% of cases), the true incidence may be higher. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Population Estimates for 2015, the U.S. population was estimated at 321,418,820. Therefore, approximately 53,596 individuals experience aSAH each year. The total addressable market for SAH is approximately $300 million in the U.S., and an estimated 50,000 patients in the European Union based on annual inpatient admissions and the average length-of-stay.

 

GTX-104R&D History and Clinical Studies to Date

 

During 2017 and 2018, Acasti Pharma U.S. (formerly Grace) evaluated GTX-104 in a four-part, single center, randomized, safety and dose-escalation and crossover study in over 80 healthy male and female subjects designed to assess the PK, bioavailability (“BA”), and the safety of GTX-104 administered via IV infusion compared to nimodipine oral capsules.

 

Details of the four-part PK study follow below:

 

Part One:
 

 

Primary objective:

 

Evaluate the preliminary cardiovascular safety and tolerability of incremental doses of IV GTX-104 in healthy male and female subjects

   

Method:

 

Evaluate incremental dose-escalation of GTX-104 administered at dose levels of 0.3 mg/h to 1.22 mg/h over 16 hours, with dose-escalation occurring every 4 hours (0.3, 0.6, 0.9, and 1.22 mg/h)

   

Adverse Events:

 

Arthralgia, constipation, flatulence, headache, infusion site irritation, peripheral edema, and vomiting—all adverse events (“AEs”) were rated as mild in severity

 

Part Two:
 

 

Primary Objective:

 

Evaluate the PK and BA of GTX-104 administered via IV infusion compared to the reference product of oral nimodipine capsules and to select the dose of IV GTX-104 with an exposure profile most closely matching that of oral nimodipine capsules

   

Method:

 

Two-period, crossover BA study. Pilot study that evaluated GTX-104 administered open-label as 1.22 mg/h continuous IV infusion for 16 hours compared to oral nimodipine (60 mg every 4 hours for 12 hours) in 12 subjects

   

Adverse Events:

 

No serious adverse events ("SAEs") in any subjects. 20.0% of subjects reported non-serious AEs following administration of GTX-104 compared to 50.0% of subjects reporting AEs following administration of oral nimodipine

 

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Part Three:

 
 

Primary Objective:

 

Determine the comparative bioavailability of IV GTX-104 versus oral nimodipine capsules and to evaluate the safety and tolerability of IV GTX 104 compared to oral nimodipine capsules in healthy male and female subjects

   

Method:

 

BA study, with GTX-104 administered as 1.1 mg/h continuous IV infusion for 28 hours compared to oral nimodipine capsules administered every four hours for 24 hours at a dose level of 60 mg in approximately 32 subjects

 

 

Adverse Events:

 

No SAEs; 20.0% of the subjects reported non-serious AEs following administration of GTX-104 whereas 8 (50.0%) subjects reported AEs following administration of oral nimodipine. Fourteen (34.1%) subjects reported AEs following administration of GTX-104 whereas 18 (43.9%) subjects reported AEs following administration of oral nimodipine

 

Part Four:
 

 

Primary Objective:

 

Determine the comparative BA of IV GTX-104 versus oral nimodipine capsules and to evaluate the safety and tolerability of IV GTX 104 compared to oral nimodipine capsules in healthy male and female subjects

   

Method:

 

BA study: extension study with the same study design as Part Three, where only GTX-104 was administered open-label as a continuous IV infusion of 1.4 mg/h for 36 hours with oral nimodipine administered for 20 hours (approximately 24 subjects)

   

Adverse Events:

 

No SAEs: 10 (41.7%) subjects reported AEs following administration of GTX-104 whereas eight (36.4%) subjects reported AEs following administration of oral nimodipine

 

 

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GTX-104 Near Term Milestones: - Conduct PK Bridging and Phase 3 Safety Studies

 

In September 2021, we initiated our planned PK bridging study to evaluate the relative bioavailability of GTX-104 compared to currently marketed oral nimodipine capsules in 50 healthy subjects.  The PK study is the next required step in our proposed 505(b)2 regulatory pathway for GTX-104. 

 

Results from this study are expected in the first half of calendar 2022, and after review with the FDA, will help determine the final design of our planned Phase 3 safety study of GTX-104 in SAH patients. If the PK study and related FDA review progress as planned, we expect to begin the Phase 3 safety study during the second half of 2022. If the safety study also meets its primary end points, we expect to submit the data in a Section 505(b)(2) NDA filing with the goal to obtain FDA approval.

 

GTX-102 Overview

 

GTX-102 is a novel, concentrated oral-mucosal spray of betamethasone intended to improve neurological symptoms of Ataxia Telangiectasia (“A-T”) for which there are no FDA approved therapies. GTX-102 is a stable, concentrated oral spray formulation comprised of the glucocorticoid betamethasone and other excipients that can be sprayed conveniently over the tongue of the A-T patient.

 

About Ataxia Telangiectasia

 

A-T is a rare genetic progressive autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder that affects children, with the hallmark symptoms of cerebellar ataxia and other motor dysfunction, and dilated blood vessels (telangiectasia) that occur in the sclera of the eyes. A-T is caused by mutations in the ataxia telangiectasia gene, which is responsible for modulating cellular response to stress, including breaks in the double strands of DNA.

 

 

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Children with A-T begin to experience balance and coordination problems when they begin to walk (toddler age), and ultimately become wheelchair-bound in their second decade of life. In pre-adolescence (between ages 5 and 8), patients experience oculomotor apraxia, dysarthria, and dysphagia. They also often develop compromised immune systems and are at increased risk of developing respiratory tract infections and cancer (typically lymphomas and leukemia) (U.S. National Cancer Institute A-T, 2015).

 

A-T is diagnosed through a combination of clinical assessment (especially neurologic and oculomotor deficits), laboratory analysis, and genetic testing. There is no known treatment to slow disease progression, and treatments that are used are strictly aimed at controlling the symptoms (e.g., physical, occupational or speech therapy for neurologic issues), or conditions secondary to the disease (e.g., antibiotics for lung infections, chemotherapy for cancer, etc.) (U.S. National Cancer Institute A-T, 2015). There are no FDA-approved therapeutic options currently available. Patients typically die by age 25 from complications of lung disease or cancer. According to a third-party report commissioned by Acasti Pharma US, A-T affects approximately 4,300 patients per year in the United States and has a potential total addressable market of $150 million, based on the number of treatable patients in the United States.

 

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The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) Genetics Home Reference, the U.S. National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD), the U.S. National Cancer Institute, and the United States National Ataxia Foundation, all estimate the incidence of A-T worldwide to be between 1:40,000 and 1:100,000 live births. It has been reported in all races throughout the world and is represented equally in males and females (Lavin, 2007; Sedgwick and Boder, 1972).

 

For the purposes of estimating prevalence, the maximum survival age observed by Crawford et al., 40 years, has been used. Assuming a maximum survival of 40 years, the total number of A-T cases has been calculated from 1975 to 2015. The highest incidence rate reported in the United States of 1:40,000 has been used to obtain an estimate of A-T prevalence today. Between 1975 and 2015, the highest number of births in one year was 4,316,233 in 2007 (Martin, 2010; Martin, 2015) and so for the purposes of this prevalence calculation, this has been taken as the number of births per year.

 

Total A-T cases/year = 25 A-T births/million live births x 4.32 million live births/year = 108 A-T cases/year. Assuming that all 108 people possibly born with A-T are still alive today, the total number of individuals with A-T today in the United States, at the very outside estimate = 108 births/year x 40 years = 4320 cases. With a U.S. population of 321,251,852 (United States Census Bureau) the highest estimated prevalence of A-T is 4320:321,251,852 or 1:74,364.

 

GTX-102R&D and Clinical Studies to Date

 

In a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial conducted in Italy, Zannolli et al. studied the effect of an oral liquid solution of betamethasone on the reduction of ataxia symptoms in 13 children (between ages 2 to 8 years) with A-T. Patients were randomly assigned to first receive either betamethasone or placebo at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg/day for 30 days: at full dose for the first 10 days, at a tapered dose on days 11–20 (i.e., for 4 days, 0.075 mg/kg/day; for 4 days, 0.050 mg/kg/day; and for 2 days, 0.025 mg/kg/day); and at full dose for the last 10 days (the full dose was tapered in the middle of the treatment phase to reduce risk from potential functional suppression of the hypothalamus-hypophysis-adrenal axis). Each phase of the trial was followed by a washout period of 30 days. The primary outcome measure was the reduction in ataxia symptoms as assessed by the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (“ICARS”).

 

In the trial, oral liquid betamethasone reduced the ICARS total score by a median of 13 points in the intent-to-treat (“ITT”) population and 16 points in the per-protocol (“PP”) population (the median percent decreases of ataxia symptoms of 28% and 31%, respectively). In the ITT population, significant differences were observed in the posture and gait disturbance (p = 0.02), kinetic function (p = 0.02), and speech disorders ICARS subscales (p = 0.02), but not in the oculomotor disorders subscale (p > 0.05). Similar results were found in the PP population. Adverse events in the trial were minimal, with no compulsory withdrawals and only minor side effects that did not require medical intervention. Small increases in body weight were observed in 12 patients on betamethasone and in 4 patients on placebo. Moon face was present in 8 patients on betamethasone. Clinical study results in A-T patients administered oral betamethasone indicated that betamethasone significantly reduced ICARS total score relative to placebo (P = 0.01). The median ICARS change score (change in score with betamethasone minus change in score with placebo) was -13 points (95% confidence interval for the difference in medians was -19 to -5.5 points).

 

   

Clinical Study Results in A-T Patients Administered Oral Betamethasone

   

Placebo

 

Betamethasone

 

Efficacy

ICARS

 

Day -1

 

Day 31

 

Day -1

 

Day 31

 

Db 

 

95% Cl for the
median

 

P valuec

Total score

 

46 (14-69)

 

41.5 (26-68)

 

50 (20-68)

 

33 (19-55)

 

-13 (-28 to 14)

 

-19 to -5.5

 

.01

I. Posture and gait disturbance

 

13.5 (3-30)

 

14.5 (7-30)

 

18 (7-29)

 

9 (4-26)

 

-5 (-15 to 5)

 

-9.5 to -1.5

 

.02

II. Kinetic function

 

22 (6-32)

 

20.5 (13-31)

 

23 (10-33)

 

18 (8-28)

 

-8 (-15 to 10)

 

-10 to -0.5

 

.02

III. Speech disorder

 

3 (1-5)

 

2.5 (2-5)

 

3 (2-5)

 

2 (1-5)

 

-1 (-3 to 1)

 

-2.5 to -0.5

 

.02

IV. Oculomotor disorders

 

3 (2-5)

 

3.5 (1·5)

 

3 (1-5)

 

3 (1-5)

 

0 (-2 to 2)

 

-2 to 1

 

.43

 

Data are medians (ranges). Thirteen ITT A-T patients are included.

 

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Median differences between the change in the ICARS score related to BETA treatment (d BETA) and the change related to placebo treatment (d placebo).

P values calculated using the Wilcoxon rank sum test.

 

Betamethasone significantly reduced ICARS total score relative to placebo (P = .01). The median ICARS change score (change in score with Betamethasone minus change in score with placebo) was -13 points (95% CI for the difference in medians was -19 to -5.5 points).

 

Based on the Zannolli data, we believe GTX-102 concentrated oral spray has the potential to provide clinical benefits in decreasing A-T symptoms, including assessments of posture and gait disturbance and kinetic, speech and oculomotor functions. In addition, GTX-102 may ease drug administration for patients experiencing A-T given its application of 1-3x 140µL of concentrated betamethasone liquid spray onto the tongue using a more convenient metered dose spray, as these A-T patients typically have difficulty swallowing (lefton-greif 2000).

 

GTX-102 PK Data to Date:

 

GTX-102 administered as a concentrated oral spray achieves similar blood levels at only 1/70th the volume of an oral solution of betamethasone. This is important for A-T patients who have difficulties swallowing large volumes of liquids.

 

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GTX-102 Near-Term Milestones: Conduct PK Bridging and Confirmatory Phase 3 Clinical Trials

 

Acasti Pharma US has licensed the data from the multicenter, double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial from Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena, Italy, where Dr. Zannolli et. al. studied the effect of oral liquid solution of betamethasone to reduce ataxia symptoms in patients with A-T. Note that this oral liquid solution is not approved in the United States, and therefore is not available for clinical use. Betamethasone is only available in the United States as an injectable or as a topical cream. However, this license gives Acasti Pharma US the right to reference the study’s data in its NDA filing. On November 12, 2015, Acasti Pharma US submitted the data from the Zannolli study to the FDA’s Division of Neurology at a pre-Investigational New Drug (“IND”) meeting and received guidance from the agency on the regulatory requirements to seek approval.

 

Based on such FDA guidance, we plan to conduct a PK bridging study of our proprietary concentrated oral spray as compared to the oral liquid solution of betamethasone used in the Zannolli study. We believe this study may result in a better, more convenient use experience as patients with A-T often have trouble swallowing. Additionally, based on the FDA’s subsequent guidance and assuming the PK bridging study meets its primary endpoint, we plan to conduct a confirmatory Phase 3 safety and efficacy trial in A-T patients. If both studies meet their primary endpoints, an NDA filing under Section 505(b)(2) would follow.

 

GTX-101 Overview

 

GTX-101 is a topical bio-adhesive film-forming bupivacaine spray designed to ease the symptoms of patients suffering with postherpetic neuralgia (“PHN”). GTX-101’s metered-dose of bupivacaine spray forms a thin bioadhesive topical film on the surface of the patient’s skin, which enables a touch-free, non-greasy application. It also comes in convenient, portable 30 ml plastic bottles. Unlike oral gabapentin and lidocaine patches, we believe that the biphasic delivery mechanism of GTX-101 has the potential for rapid onset and continuous pain relief for up to eight hours. No skin sensitivity was reported in a Phase 1 study.

 

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About Postherpetic Neuralgia (PHN)

 

PHN is neuropathic pain due to damage caused by the varicella zoster virus (“VZV”). Infection with the VZV causes two distinct clinical conditions. Primary VZV infection causes varicella (i.e., chickenpox), a contagious rash illness that typically occurs among young children. Secondary VZV can reactivate clinically, decades after initial infection, to cause herpes zoster (“HZ”), otherwise known as shingles. Acute HZ arises when dormant virus particles, persisting within an affected sensory ganglion from the earlier, primary infection with VZV become reactivated when cellular immunity to varicella decreases. Viral particles replicate and may spread to the dorsal root, into the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, and through peripheral sensory nerve fibers down to the level of the skin. Viral particles also may circulate in the blood. This reactivation is accompanied by inflammation of the skin, immune response, hemorrhage, and destruction of peripheral and central neurons and their fibers. Following such neural degeneration, distinct types of pathophysiological mechanisms involving both the central and peripheral nervous systems may give rise to the severe nerve pain associated with PHN.

 

While the rash associated with HZ typically heals within two to four weeks, the pain may persist for months or even years, and this PHN manifestation is the most common and debilitating complication of HZ. There is currently no consensus definition for PHN, but it has been suggested by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (“CDC”) that PHN is best defined as pain lasting at least three months after resolution of the rash. PHN persisting beyond three months may occur in 10% to 20% of HZ patients aged over fifty years (CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2008).

 

PHN is associated with significant loss of function and reduced quality of life, particularly in the elderly. It has a detrimental effect on all aspects of patients’ quality of life. The nature of PHN pain varies from mild to excruciating in severity, constant, intermittent, or triggered by trivial stimuli. Approximately half of patients with PHN describe their pain as “horrible” or “excruciating,” ranging in duration from a few minutes to constant on a daily or almost daily basis (Katz, 2004). The pain can disrupt sleep, mood, work, and activities of daily living, adversely impacting the quality of life and leading to social withdrawal and depression. PHN is the number-one cause of intractable, debilitating pain in the elderly, and has been cited as the leading cause of suicide in chronic pain patients over the age of 70 (Hess, 1990).

 

Current treatment of PHN most often consists of oral gabapentin and lidocaine patches, and refractory cases may be prescribed opioids to address persistent pain. Gabapentin and opioid abuse have continued to proliferate, and lidocaine patches are suboptimal for many reasons. According to a third-party report commissioned by Acasti Pharma US, approximately 40% of patients using lidocaine patches experience insufficient pain relief. Lidocaine patches are difficult to use, fall off, and look unsightly with possible skin sensitivity and irritation. Additionally, an optimal analgesic effect could take up to two weeks to be achieved. PHN affects approximately 150,000 patients per year in the United States. According to a third-party report commissioned by Acasti Pharma US, the total addressable market for GTX-101 is $1.6 billion, consisting of $400 million for PHN pain and $1.2 billion for non-PHN pain.

 

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While the PHN will resolve within 1 to 2 months in many cases, and within the year in the majority of cases, it may persist in some patients for an extended period of time (more than 1 year), adding to the prevalence. On average, 4.6% of patients with PHN still experience pain at 1 year following development of the HZ rash, with 9% being the most reported. In a very small number of patients (2%), PHN remains persistent for over 5 years. Assuming in the worst case that 2% of PHN patients will experience pain for up to 10 years, an extra 2500 patients per year for 10 years could be added to the prevalence of 125,000 a year, adding 25,000 patients to any given year.

 

The CDC estimates that there are 1 million cases of HZ a year in the United States. The definition of PHN used in the pivotal study for the approved HZ vaccine was, “pain persisting or appearing more than 90 days after the onset of rash (Oxman, 2005).” Using this definition, and the numbers provided by the CDC, PHN would occur in approximately125,000-150,000 new cases per year.

 

GTX-101 R&D History and Clinical Studies Completed to Date

 

To date, Acasti Pharma US has conducted three Phase I